MOW (Maintenance of Way) Load for a Flat Car

Our pres(ident) is a stone bonkers genius at taking “mundane” railroad items and arranging them into abfab pieces. Here’s an example – a common or garden flat car with a MOW on top.

Here’s the flat car:

G Scale flat car gussied up to make it look used

G Scale flat car gussied up to make it look used

All the action is taking place on Chuck Whitlock’s workbench in our Workshop (a converted 20 foot container).

MOW placed on top of the flat car

MOW placed on top of the flat car

Here you can see the details that Chuck has added to the wee truck attched by a link and pin to the workers car:

Detail on tool car

Detail on tool car

Chains have been added to keep the MOW on the flat car

Chains have been added to keep the MOW on the flat car

Ready to go out on the layout:

Mini diorama ready to rock and roll

Mini diorama ready to rock and roll

Great work Chuck!

 

 

 

New Gutters for the Barn and a New Sign

For the past year we have been creating scenery around the outside of the Barn. The Barn has a huge roof and as a result when it rains it’s like Niagara Falls on the scenery below. Hopefully, as of today, the downpour onto the scenery will cease – gutters have been installed. Club member Lonnie Dickson who was the superintendent of works for the project took these photos of the installation:

Gutters installed

Gutters installed

The gutter installation crew next removed the remnants of the old sign advertising our presence. Then came the placement of the new sign that tells people on the CWR side of the tracks where we live. The letters of the sign and logos were produced by our maestro of CAD Joe Cooper. Painting of the letters and backdrop was the responsibility of Slosher #1 (me). Lonnie affixed the letters to the backdrop with stainless  steel screws acquired by our electrical guru Jim Williams.

Right side of sign being put in place

Right side of sign being put in place

Left hand side of the sign being placed

Left hand side of the sign being placed

Completed sign

Completed sign

Great team work guys.

Let it rain!!!!!!!!!

 

 

A rats nest in a diesel

There has been a collective decision that the excess rolling stock and motive power should be made available to whomever might like them provided they make a modest donation to the club’s coffers. The excess diesels, which are too modern to be used on our layout, have been stored in my train room for nigh on two years. I brought them in and Chuck spruced them up by removing the accumulated dust and external detritus. The locos had a piece of green on top which I assumed meant that chief electrical engineer, Jim Williams, had given them the thumbs up. When shown to Jim he said he had never tested them.! We agreed that making them available without testing was not cool. Here’s the loco before testing ……

The loco before being checked

The loco before being checked

Looks fine, right? Well …….

First peek inside

First peek inside

Oh s%#t!!!!!!! Better have a good look see……..

Whew! No dead bodies!!!!

Whew! No dead bodies!!!!

Chuck repaired the wrecked wiring in the top part of the loco and Jim cleaned and restored the “works” to operating condition.

After cleaning with wiring  repaired or replaced and tested

After cleaning with wiring repaired or replaced and tested

Never a dull moment!!!!!

Wiring the Layout and Renewing the Sea Wall

It takes a lot of effort to have the layout operate flawlessly four hours a day. seven days a week, two hundred and eighty days a year. In this picture you can see several projects going on at the same time. Frank Davis is on the floor working on wiring. The sea wall, as you can see is being replaced (in our imagination the layout runs around Mendo Cove -the floor being the sea). The original sea wall was more “artistic” but “the little people” liked to hang on to it and it deteriorated over time so …….. replace in toto.

Workin' on the railroad

Workin’ on the railroad Frank Davis style

The stack of boxes o0f screws are for use on the addition to the west wall. The black “plate” enables us to step on the main tracks whilst working on the next level.