Enhancing Three Chop Ridge – the Diorama in the NW inside corner of the layout

Archaeologists excavation of a Pomo Native American site on Three Chop Ridge set in motion a series of events which led to the discovery of the wreck of the sailing ship The frolic off  of Point Cabrillo. We have, for a long time, wanted to include a flume on the layout and the changes being made to Three Chop Ridge will enable us to add a flume.

The first step in the re-working was to put sky over over the window at the north end. Here you see Mike Aplet and Lonnie Dickson installing the panel I painted.

Mike and Lonnie covering the window with a panel to make it look like sky

Mike and Lonnie covering the window with a panel to make it look like sky

A backdrop had previously been installed in the north west corner. Installing trees along the backdrop was the next step.

Just one tree near the post when work began

Just one tree near the post when work began

Dead tree added to the left

Dead tree added to the left

Trees added along the wall

Trees added along the wall

Concreting the forest flooor will be the next step.

 

Painting the hills in the NW Interior corner and installing the backdrop

These photos span a period of months largely because we can only access the interior walls of the barn when the CWR is not running. Here you can see the back wall with just sky:

The starting point

The starting point

Painting of the hills in progress

Painting of the hills in progress

The hills all painted as far as the post

The hills all painted as far as the post

The backdrop awaiting installation

The backdrop awaiting installation

The backside of the backdrop that will only be seen from the outside of the Barn

The backside of the backdrop that will only be seen from the outside of the Barn

VP Lonnie Dickson specking out the location for the backdrop

VP Lonnie Dickson specking out the location for the backdrop

VP Lonnie as seen by his delightful wife

VP Lonnie as seen by his delightful wife

Lonnie carefully placing the backdrop in place

Lonnie carefully placing the backdrop in place

Progress but a ways to go – more painting and then installation of trees.

Pratt Station – located in the North Corner of the West Outside Wall

Jeff Pratt was a member of the club who has passed on. He was a superb model maker – he built the replica of the existing Fort Bragg Skunk Train Depot which can be found on the on the east inside wall of the Barn. We try to incorporate into the layout (the Mendocino Coast Model Railroad & Navigation Co.) a small tribute to past members. Hence Pratt Station:

Pratt Station

Pratt Station

The station is located opposite a MOW (Maintenance of Way) camp.

MOW camp replete with crosswalk

MOW camp replete with crosswalk

And guess what? Yup. A MOW consist!

MOW consist passing by Pratt Station on the MCMR&HS G Scale layout in Fort Bragg CA

MOW consist passing by Pratt Station

And for thirsty locos ……

Water tank and windmill pump to fill it

Water tank and windmill pump to fill it

Constructing the base for the Homestead at the base of Three Chop Ridge

In the middle of the pic below you can see a small house and to its left the outline of a tunnel portal:

Wide angle of Three Chop Ridge

Wide angle of Three Chop Ridge

The homestead is sitting on a platform. This platform is strong enough to be stood upon so that we can reach the top of the ridge. The platform was the last piece to be installed of theThree Chop Ridge frame. The pics below show the construction in progress.

Plwood for the homestead platform

Frank Davis bringing in the plywood from which the platform will be cut after preliminary fitting. Tony Phillips is watching.

Scibing the plywood for the homestead platform

Chuck Whitlock scribing the plywood for the next cut. Frank Davis is holding.

Fitting track on the homestead platform

Tony Phillips and Frank Davis helping lay the track on the platform

 

Northwest corner of the layout aka Three Chop Ridge – More pics by Mike Aplet

Work on Three chop Ridge continues apace as these recent pics from Mike Aplet show. Why is it named “Three Chop Ridge”? Because, it was an archaeological dig on Three Chop Ridge of a Pomo Indian village that, ultimately, led to the discovery of the wreck of the Frolic which in turn led to the opening up of the Redwood lumber industry along the Mendocino Coast.

G Scale model of Three Chop Ridge

Three Chop Ridge in the NW Corner of the layout

Building trees on Three Chop Ridge G scale model train layout

Tree trunks ready for tree tops

Mike Aplet in front of Three Chop Ridge

Mike Aplet in front of Three Chop Ridge. The hill rises some 10 feet from the floor